Criminal Defense

Dedicated Miami Criminal Defense Attorney

If you or a loved one are under investigation, indictment, or have been arrested, you need the assistance of one of the hardest working criminal defense attorneys in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale. One with a proven track record of winning, a solid reputation, and a litany of former satisfied clients. That’s me, Jordan Redavid, and I’m eager to take on the challenges your case may present.

When it comes to criminal defense, results matter most. I have the knowledge and ability to handle a wide variety of criminal matters successfully. Everything from misdemeanors in state court to felonies in federal court. No matter the venue, the stakes are always high. After all, someone’s liberty is on the line. That’s why I provide a dedicated and passionate defense for all of my clients and pride myself on outworking and outthinking the prosecution. Call 305-938-9939 for immediate help with ANY criminal charges.

What Happens During a Criminal Case?

BE PREPARED

If you or a loved one are facing investigation or have been arrested, be prepared with the knowledge of what to expect in a criminal case.

The following slides show the timeline of an average criminal case, from investigation to potential trial.

WAS A CRIME REALLY COMMITED?

When police become aware of a suspected crime, it is up to them to determine whether the crime occurred and whether anyone should be arrested.

Stage One

Investigation

The investigation begins when police are informed of suspected criminal activity.

POLICE SEEK EVIDENCE

Police collect physical evidence, interview witnesses, conduct searches and identify suspects.

DID YOU KNOW?

The police do not have to tell you that you are a suspect. If you are approached or stopped by police, or asked to speak with them, you have a right to refuse to talk, and you also have the right to withhold consent to any search of your person or property.

Stage Two

Arrest

You may be arrested if police uncover evidence that provides probable cause for an arrest.

WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

During an arrest, you will either be taken into custody or directed in writing to appear in court on a specific date. The manner of arrest depends on the severity of the charge.

DID YOU KNOW?

Florida prosecutes felonies, misdemeanors and noncriminal violations. Noncriminal violations are the least serious, and are often penalized with a fine. A misdemeanor is less serious than a felony but can still result in up to one year of jail time. A felony is the most serious charge and can result in more than one year of jail time.

IF YOU ARE TAKEN INTO CUSTODY

If you are taken to jail, you may be: released with no charges filed, released on bail or held without bail awaiting arraignment. If you are arrested, talk to an attorney before saying anything to the police.

YOU ARE IN CONTROL

You can stop an interrogation at any time, even if you have already waived your right to remain silent. You do not have to agree to anything during interrogation, like taking lesser charges in exchange for talking.

DID YOU KNOW?

Many interrogations rely on your stress to get you to confess. Between 42 and 55 percent of suspects confess during an interrogation — some falsely just to stop the procedure. Don’t give in. Know your rights and always have an attorney present to protect you.

Stage Three

Interrogation

When police interview you, they are trying to to get you to confess. And they can lie to get you to do so. Your lawyer can help beat their tricks.

WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

At the arraignment you are formally told of charges, informed of your rights and given a chance to respond to charges by entering a plea of Not Guilty, Guilty or No Contest. With few exceptions, you should plead Not Guilty, demand any discovery in the prosecutor’s possession, and request a trial by jury. This will reset the case and give your attorney time to prepare a defense.

YOUR OPTIONS FOR DEFENSE

A plea of not guilty means you claim you did not commit the crime. A plea of guilty means you admit to committing the crime, and a conviction is entered into the record at the arraignment. A plea of no contest means you do not plead guilty but do not disagree with the charge.

DID YOU KNOW?

A plea of No Contest (nolo contendere) results in a criminal conviction. By pleading No Contest, you waive your right to a trial. However, a plea of No Contest is not an admission of guilt. This can be beneficial in any civil proceeding that arises from the the same criminal charge.

Stage Four

Arraignment

The arraignment is the first time you will be asked to appear in court. It is procedural, not a trial.

Stage Five

Bail/Bond

Bail, or pre-trial release, is usually determined within 48 hours of your arrest; at your first appearance before a judge. Your attorney can help argue for the lowest possible bail and help you decided the best time to post bail.

WHAT DOES THE JUDGE CONSIDER?

The purpose of this hearing is limited; guilt or innocence is not at issue. The judge can consider your past criminal record, the nature of the allegations, the strength of evidence, potential danger to the community, and risk of flight versus your constitutional presumption or entitlement to a reasonable bail. You might be held with no bond, granted a monetary bond, pre-trial release program, or released on your own recognizance (ROR’d).

DISCOVERY IS CRITICAL

For the defense, discovery can involve acquiring police reports, taking depositions, receiving documents from opposing counsel, including evidence the prosecution plans to introduce at trial, and receiving drug or alcohol test results.

Stage Six

Discovery

Discovery is the pre-trial period when a case is investigated and the parties involved trade information. This is your attorney’s chance to find out about the prosecution’s case.

Stage Seven

Pre-Trial

A pre-trial period occurs after an arraignment but before the start of a criminal trial.

WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

In pre-trial, your attorney will prepare for trial, attempt to prevent a trial, or attempt to secure certain advantages at trial. This can include filing motions to cancel or dismiss charges, filing motions to prevent evidence from being used at trial, challenging the admissibility of evidence and legal research.

TRIAL MAY BE IN YOUR BEST INTEREST

Much of the work of a case occurs during the pre-trial period. Some cases are resolved during this period, although this should only occur if not going to trial is in the best interest of the defendant.

WHAT IS A PLEA BARGAIN?

A plea bargain is an agreement in which the prosecutor agrees to drop a charge (or charges), reduce a charge or recommend a lesser sentence in exchange for a plea of Guilty or No Contest (nolo contendere).

Stage Eight

Plea Bargain

More than 90 percent of convictions are the result of a plea bargain, but a plea bargain is not always in the defendant’s best interest.

ONLY ACT IN YOUR BEST INTEREST

Your attorney will try to get the best offer and will recommend whether you should accept it. The answer is not always yes.

WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

A trial proceeds through the following steps:

  • Voir Dire, or jury selection.
  • Opening statements. The prosecution must make an opening statement. The defense may choose to make an opening statement but does not have to.
  • Presentation of evidence. The prosecution will present its case first. The defense then has the option to offer evidence or witnesses. The prosecution has the option to offer a rebuttal, in the form of evidence, to any part of the defense's case.
  • Closing arguments by both sides.
  • Deliberation and verdict.

Stage Nine

Trial

You may choose to go to trial to defend yourself against all charges. You have the right to a trial by jury, or you may opt to have your trial heard by a judge.

Stage Ten

Appeals

Ideally, you will be successful at trial. However, should you be convicted, you have the right to appeal a guilty verdict.

WHAT IS AN APPEAL?

An appeal is a review of the evidence already admitted at trial; it is not a new trial. You must file a notice of appeal within 30 days, and appellate courts strictly enforce this 30-day deadline.

DID YOU KNOW?

You can appeal a verdict if you believe the evidence presented at trial did not support a guilty verdict, or if you believe an error was made by the prosecution, your attorney or law enforcement that was harmful to your case.

There for you, in and out of the courtroom

In my entire career, I have never prosecuted anyone, only defended them. Many criminal defense attorneys started out as prosecutors. I did not. I defended those who couldn’t afford legal representation, then founded my law firm so that I could focus my energy on fewer clients at one time.

Nobody can guarantee results, but a top criminal lawyer should be able to promise that he or she will be available to their clients. That is the promise I make to you. Call 305-938-9939 at any time, and I will answer or call you back immediately. I treat my clients as I would want to be treated if the roles were reversed.

I am ready to represent you in any criminal proceedings.

    Dedicated to providing the best defense available

    In a criminal justice system that sees more than 95% of cases resolve with plea bargains, settling criminal cases is part of doing business. For some law firms, though, that’s their only business, despite touting themselves as “trial lawyers.” Not Redavid Law PLLC. Sure, I settle some cases, but I also routinely try cases to verdict too — and with great success. That matters even in my plea bargain negotiations.

    Some attorneys counsel their clients to take bad deals simply because the prosecution draws a line in the sand, and the attorneys are too afraid to tell their clients to go to trial. Talking to judges and prosecutors is one thing, but convincing juries is an art form. If an attorney is not confident in court, he or she may not want to be embarrassed or suffer a loss for fear that others may find out. Putting their own interests above their clients. Think about it: do you really think that in 95%+ of cases a guilty plea is really in the client’s best interests? With Redavid Law PLLC, you can rest assured that I am advocating for your best interests, not my own.

    NOT AFRAID TO DEFEND TO THE VERY END

    In my experience, one of the best negotiating tools is having a reputation as a fierce trial lawyer — not just in marketing materials, but in real cases with actual winning results. That’s something earned, not given or bought.
    EMAIL JORDAN

    Ready to defend you in state or federal court

    The State of Florida can prosecute you for misdemeanors and felonies. So, too, can the United States government. Sometimes even both at the same time. That’s why it’s imperative to have an attorney who can handle both state and federal cases. There are different rules, statutes, and nuances depending on who files the charges. It’s easy for the unfamiliar to make a critical mistake. I have the expertise to defend you in any venue and the commitment to see your case all the way through to a successful resolution.

    I am ready to represent you in any criminal proceedings, including felonies and misdemeanors; state and federal cases; appeals; DUI; drug possession; drug sale, trafficking, cultivation, or manufacture; wiretapping; identity theft; embezzlement; medicare fraud; extortion and much more.

    NOT AFRAID TO DEFEND TO THE VERY END

    Only the best Miami criminal defense attorney can ensure that his or her reputation carries weight with prosecutors by going to trial and getting good results.
    EMAIL JORDAN

    Skilled in the art of crafting arguments for appeals

    I also have the specific expertise necessary to handle your appeal. An appeal is very different from a trial. It is intended to determine whether your trial was just and proper. An appeal is not a second chance to re-state your case, but it can be your last chance to clear your name. I understand what that means for a client. That’s why I consider it a privilege to handle an appeal and will work tirelessly for a successful outcome.

    It may seem straightforward to assume that any criminal defense lawyer can also handle an appeal. A trial is a trial, right? Wrong. The same arguments that trial attorneys use to persuade trial judges and juries fall on deaf ears in an appellate court. Appellate attorneys need special skills — the ability to argue a case with creative and effective new strategies.

    NOT AFRAID TO DEFEND TO THE VERY END

    If you are in need of a criminal defense or appeals attorney, or know someone who is, please call me for a free initial consultation. I am available any time, day or night.
    EMAIL JORDAN

    Recent Results

    At Redavid Law, quality of service is matched only by results.

    CHARGE

    DUI


    FACTS

    After failing to perform to standards on five field sobriety exercises, the driver in this case was arrested for DUI. He refused to provide a breath sample.


    RESULT

    NOT GUILTY

    on all counts

    CHARGE

    RICO/Grand Theft


    FACTS

    Over a dozen people were captured on video stealing materials from a construction site. Of all defendants, only Jordan's client received a dismissal.


    RESULT

    CHARGES DISMISSED

    before trial

    CHARGE

    Possession of Cannabis


    FACTS

    An officer observed the defendant rolling a marijuana cigarette in his car while parked. The officer had the driver step out of the vehicle and arrested him.


    RESULT

    CHARGES DISMISSED

    on the day of the trial

    I have worked with several attorneys practicing various types of law, and based on my experience I would highly recommend Mr. Redavid to represent you.

    For help right away, or a free initial consultation, email any time of the day or night, or call 305-938-9939. I answer calls and email 24/7.

    I am only as good as the results I obtain for my clients – a truth that many lawyers hide from, but I embrace. My track record of dismissals, charge reductions, and, most of all, not guilty verdicts speak for themselves. But so, too, does my large family of satisfied clients and their loved ones.